Robotic Welding

Welding using robotic arms is a long established practice in industry.

Robot Welding simulates the operation of a robotic welding arm with all the operating functions of a real robot. 
This program is useful for schools coding software requirements. Robot Welding brings to the classroom an easy to use interface with a realistic 3D graphical robotic welding arm at an affordable price. This program is useful to demonstrate the principles behind a robotic welding arm and enable students to write control programs that weld steel rods together placed on a table. This simulates a typical robotic arm scenario found in industry.

The student Controls the robot by clicking on icons that control each of the robots stepper motors. The parts of the robot are colour coded for easy identification. 

Program robot arm with powerful control language. 
A powerful programming language is included that allows a script of commands to control and move each element of the robotic welding arm. The language uses simple commands that students can get to grips with quickly. Robot Welding is specially designed for use in the classroom, this is reflected in the easy to use programming language, Programs contain primitive commands such as: – 
MOVE 1000,200,392 
All commands can be placed in procedures. The robotic arm incorporates sensors enabling feedback to be used in programs. Decision-making IF statements and loops with the REPEAT and WHILE commands can be used in programs. The MOVE command allows easy movement to a specific Cartesian co-ordinate. Programs can be saved for future use. 

Weld steel bars. 
A 3D table contains steel bars to be welded together, the end of the robotic arm has a welder bolted on.
The robot is programmed to weld each bar together, there are three rows of bars to be welded. Steel bars can be re-positioned so a new program is need to move the arm to weld joints. Weld joints can be undone after the program has finished. The robot can use X,Y,Z Cartesian co-ordinates to move to a specific point. 

Robot Welding

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Robot Laser Cutter

Robot Laser Cutter is a useful piece of software that simulates a robotic programmable arm with a laser. The laser cuts through items…rlc7

3D Graphics 
Robot Laser Cutter simulates the operation of a robotic arm with all the operating functions of a real robot. 
Robot Laser Cutter brings to the classroom an easy to use interface with a realistic 3D graphical robotic arm at an affordable price. This program is useful to demonstrate the principles behind a robotic moving arm and enable students to write control programs that use a laser beam to cut through strips of plastic on a table. This simulates a typical robotic arm scenario found in industry. The student Controls the robot by clicking on icons that control each of the robots stepper motors. The parts of the robot are colour coded for easy identification. 
Program robot arm with powerful control language 
This program is useful for schools coding software requirements. A powerful programming language is included that allows a script of commands to control and move each element of the robotic arm. The language uses simple commands that students can get to grips with quickly. Robot Laser Cutter is specially designed for use in the classroom, this is reflected in the easy to use programming language, Programs contain primitive commands such as: – 
TURN WRIST CW 3 
All commands can be placed in procedures. The robotic arm incorporates sensors enabling feedback to be used in programs. Decision-making IF statements and loops with the REPEAT and WHILE commands can be used in programs. The MOVE command allows easy movement to a specific Cartesian co-ordinate. Programs can be saved for future use. 
Laser cuts through objects. 
The laser cuts through plastic sheets that are placed on a table. The robot can use X,Y,Z Cartesian co-ordinates to move to a specific point. Robot Laser Cutter features a 3 dimensional version of a robotic arm at a price much lower than a comparable real arm.

http://www.camboard-technology.com/robotlasercutter.aspx

 

 

Show students how the inside of a computer works

VR PC is a virtual computer resource that simulates a virtual p.c. Great for the classroom to vrpc_scr19sm.

VR PC is a virtual computer that simulates the main processes of a working PC. The virtual computer program is a great introduction to the inner workings of a computer. The 3D realistic parts of a virtual computers motherboard, sound card, AGP card, hard disk drive and cd/dvd drive are all simulated. Students can see what is going on inside a virtual computer. The computers main systems are simulated.
The motherboard can be rotated and moved, you can zoom in onto the motherboard to see simulations close up. VR PC is a powerful simulation of the main processes involved in running applications and using hardware on a Windows Personal Computer.

Great for use with computer science and computing curriculum.

VR PC simulates these events…

Mouse events

Simulates data travelling from the mouse port to the i/o controller then to south bridge. Data then travels to the north bridge and onto the CPU. From the CPU the mouse data is transferred back to the north bridge and into a memory location on the AGP card. When the data leaves the CPU it will update the graphics card with a new pointer position or menu opened etc.

Keyboard events

Simulates data travelling from the Keyboard port to the i/o controller then to south bridge. Data then travels to the north bridge and onto the CPU. From the CPU the Keyboard data is transferred back to the north bridge and into a memory location on the AGP card. When the data leaves the CPU it will update the graphics card with a new text cursor position etc.

Hard Disk events

(Read to Memory)  simulates data being read from the hard drive to memory. The arms on the hard disk move across the platters to read data from a specific location. Data is then transferred to the hard disk controller which sits under the platters. A ribbon cable (not shown) connects the controller to the IDE slot on the motherboard. Data moves through the IDE slot to the south bridge. . Data then travels to the north bridge and onto the CPU. Data is transferred to memory from the CPU.

(Write from Memory) simulates data being written onto the hard drive from memory. Data is read from memory into the CPU. Data leaves the CPU and travels to the north bridge. From here the data travels to the south bridge. Data is then routed to the IDE connectors. Data is received onto the disk controller and then transferred to the write heads on the arms of the hard disk. The arms on the hard disk move across the platters to write data to a specific location

CD/DVD Events

CD/DVD (Read to Memory) This simulates data being read from the CD. The laser is switched on to read data from a specific location. Data is then transferred to the CD controller which sits under the laser. A ribbon cable (not shown) connects the controller to the IDE slot on the motherboard. Data moves through the IDE slot to the south bridge. . Data then travels to the north bridge and onto the CPU. Data is transferred to memory from the CPU.

(Write from Memory) This simulates data being written onto the cd from memory. Data is read from memory into the CPU. Data leaves the CPU and travels to the north bridge. From here the data travels to the south bridge. Data is then routed to the IDE connectors. Data is received onto the disk controller and then converted into signals that fire a laser underneath the cd.

Sound Card Events

Sound Card (Microphone) Simulates analogue data from a microphone converted to digital data. Analogue data is inputted into the sound card through a socket. An analogue to digital converter (ADC) converts the signal into digital data. The sound card moves this data through the PCI connector onto the PCI bus. The data travels to the south bridge. Data then travels to the north bridge and onto the CPU.

Sound Card (Loudspeakers) Simulates digital data being converted into an analogue signal which is fed to the speaker sockets on the sound card. Data leaves the CPU to the north bridge and travels to the south bridge. Data is routed to the PCI bus. The PCI socket connects the sound card to the PCI bus. Data is transferred from the PCI bus to the sound card.

 

Teach how a hard disk drive works

Visual Hard Drive simulates the operation of a computer’s hard disk drive and shows how a hard drive works. The virtual drive has a controller board, four magnetic platters and eight read/write heads. Up to 32 bits of data can be written and read from the hard disk drive. The drive simulates data being written and read from the top platter and shows how a hard drive works.vishd5
Virtual data can be written in a safe environment. Data can be read from the virtual disk and be displayed as binary, bytes and ASCII.

Visual Hard Drive has four magnetic platters and eight read/write heads.

Data limits
Our hard drive is fixed to write at sector 1 from here we can write 32 bits of data. In total 32 bits of data can be written to the disk.
The program simulates data being written to sector 1. The start address is 0000000200 Addresses are offset from this start address.
Write to disk

Every part of the platter has its own unique capability to store a binary 0 or binary 1 when writing to the platter the magnetic surface will contain either 0 or 1. In our simulation a red dot signifies a 0 a gap signifies a binary 1. As the disk is spinning all the time a circular data trail is left.
Visual Hard Drive shows how a hard drive works.

 

Teach how CD drives work

Students can practice writing data to a virtual 3D disk the program shows the laser firing and a pit created in the disk.

vis_cd_scrVisual Disk simulates the operation of a CD/DVD Rom drive the simulation enables virtual disks to be created.

Shows how cds work.
A CD-R type disk is used in simulations.
The laser is shown writing data to the CD-R disk. Virtual disks can be created in a safe environment. Data can be read of the virtual disk and be displayed as binary, bytes and ASCII.In the main window is a virtual CD/DVD drive this contains a light blue CD-R disk. The CD Rom drive sits on a PCB this contains circuits that control the operation of reading and writing data from a disk. A motor spins the CD. As the disk spins the laser fires and reads data or writes data to the disk and shows how cds work.

When writing to a disk a laser beam is visible between the laser and the disk. When the laser makes contact with the disk a pit is created in the disk this signifies a binary 0. If the laser does not fire the disk is left untouched, creating a land section, this signifies a binary 1. The disk simulation shows each individual bit of data and shows how cds work.

Data limits

Our CD-ROM drive is fixed to write at sector 270 from here we can write 32 bits of data. In total 32 bits of data can be written to the disk. The program simulates data being written to sector 270.

The start address is 00087000 Addresses are offset from this start address.

Every part of the disk has its own unique capability to store a binary 0 or binary 1 when writing to the disk the laser is fired to make a pit in the disk this pit signifies a binary 0. If the laser does not fire a land section is created this signifies a binary 1. Because the disk is spinning all the time a circular data trail is left.

In the main window the CD-R disk will spin. The laser will fire and produce a pit if the data is set to 0. If the data is set to 1 the laser will not fire and will leave a land section on the disk. Depending on which boxes you have set to 0 or 1 a trail of lands or pits will appear on the surface of the CD-R. The program writes data beginning at address 00087000 and finishes writing at 00087003.

Explore the parts of a computer.

Teaching students the components that go into a typical p.c is made easier by the introduction of Computer Explorerce_scr1.

Explore the inside of a personal computer, without removing the case. Computer Explorer lets you see inside a computer and zoom and pan round the parts of a computer.

Shows the keyboard mouse and monitor.

The computer system is shown in 3D. You can zoom in and pan round the system.

Includes a virtual computer tower with all the parts of a computer.
Click on a computer part and a description is displayed of what the part does.

 

Teach how a server works

VR Server simulates the main processes of a working Server. The program is a great introduction to the inner workings of a how a server works.
The 3D realistic parts of the servers motherboard, 2 X CPU, 2 X RAID hard disk drives, LAN and cd/dvd drive are all simulated.vr_server_scr3
Students can see how a server works. The servers main systems are simulated.
The motherboard can be rotated and moved, you can zoom in onto the motherboard to see simulations close up.
VR Server is a powerful simulation of the main processes involved in running applications and using hardware on a Windows server,
Great for use with computer science and computing curriculum.
VR Server simulates these events..

Mouse Events
Mouse to I/O

The mouse port connects to the LPC I/O controller.
Mouse to CPU 1
1.The mouse port connects to the LPC I/O controller.
2. Data is moved to the south bridge and then to the north bridge.
3. From here data is transferred into CPU 1.

Mouse to Memory
1.The mouse port connects to the LPC I/O controller.
2. Data is moved to the south bridge and then to the north bridge.
3. From here data is transferred into CPU 1.
4. Data is then transferred into memory.

Keyboard Events
Keyboard to I/O

The keyboard port connects to the LPC I/O controller.

Keyboard to CPU 1
1.The keyboard port connects to the LPC I/O controller.
2. Data is moved to the south bridge and then to the north bridge.
3. From here data is transferred into CPU 1.
4. Data is then transferred into memory.

Keyboard to Memory
1.The keyboard port connects to the LPC I/O controller.
2. Data is moved to the south bridge and then to the north bridge.
3. From here data is transferred into CPU 1.
4. Data is then transferred into memory.

RAID 1
RAID 1 (Read) to CPU 1

1.The arms move over the platters of RAID 1 hard disk. Data is read and transferred through the E-IDE controller.
2. Data is then sent to the south bridge and onto the north bridge.
3. From here data is transferred into CPU 1.

RAID 1 (Read) to Memory
1. The arms move over the platters of RAID 1 hard disk. Data is read and transferred through the E-IDE controller.
2. Data is then sent to the south bridge and onto the north bridge.
3. From here data is transferred into CPU 1.
4. The CPU moves the data into memory.

RAID 1 (Read)
1.The arms move over the platters of RAID 1 hard disk.
Data is read and transferred through the E-IDE controller.

RAID 1 – RAID 2
RAID 1 – 2 (Write) from CPU 1

1. Data is transferred into CPU 1.
2. Data is then sent to the north bridge and onto the south bridge.
3. Data is transferred to both RAID hard disk drives where the arms move over onto the platters and write data.

RAID 1 – 2 (Write) from Memory
1. Data is read in from memory.
2. From here data is transferred into CPU 1.
3. Data is then sent to the north bridge and onto the south bridge.
4. Data is transferred to both RAID hard disk drives where the arms move over onto the platters and write data.

RAID 1 – 2 (Write)
1. Data is transferred to both RAID hard disk drives where the arms move over onto the platters and write data.

CD/DVD
CD (Read) to CPU 1

This simulates data being read from the CD.
1.The laser is switched on to read data from a specific location.
Data is then transferred to the CD controller which sits under the laser.
A ribbon cable (not shown) connects the controller to the IDE slot on the motherboard.
2.Data moves through the IDE slot to the south bridge.
3.Data then travels to the north bridge and onto CPU 1.

CD (Read) to Memory
This simulates data being read from the CD.
1.The laser is switched on to read data from a specific location.
Data is then transferred to the CD controller which sits under the laser.
A ribbon cable (not shown) connects the controller to the IDE slot on the motherboard.
2.Data moves through the IDE slot to the south bridge.
3.Data then travels to the north bridge and onto CPU 1.
4.The CPU moves the data into memory.

CD (Read)
The laser is switched on to read data from a specific location.
Data is then transferred to the CD controller which sits under the laser.
A ribbon cable (not shown) connects the controller to the IDE slot on the motherboard.